Every Sail is a Lesson Learned

I subscribe to Christian Williams on YouTube. Williams is a solo sailor who recently published a book titled, Alone Together: Sailing Solo to Hawaii and Beyond. It was the associated video that first got my attention. Yesterday, before my sail, I sat with my coffee and watched his video about preparing to sail in high winds.

I am new to solo sailing and everything that I read or hear about the topic begins with, “prepare for the unexpected before you leave the dock.” It may seem like an obvious point to make but putting it into practice requires considerable deliberation. It seems (to me at least) that the most important characteristic of the exercise is that it is perpetual — no matter how long you have sailed or what type of experience you have there will always be new scenarios you can imagine. It is that imagination that allows you to visualize successfully overcoming problems when they occur.

Problems turn up not just when you least expect them, but where. Click To Tweet

After sailing last week in high winds I wanted to see Williams’ message. His focus on fouling is great advice for any sailor, especially one who goes solo. Even the most seasoned sailor (which I am not) needs the humility and sobriety to prepare for unexpected conditions. And given the fact that conditions can change so quickly, there is never a day when you can ignore the practice.

The lesson I learned on yesterday’s sail is that problems turn up not just when you least expect them, but where.

I must admit it was just a stupid mistake, the kind that I don’t like to admit. I’m actually writing this post because I feel like I should call myself out. We had a perfect sail on a southeast tack in moderate northeast winds. Chicago faded in the distance and we enjoyed a little picnic lunch. The trip home was equally uneventful.

Just outside of Belmont harbor we turned into the wind and furled the sails. Everything was neat and tidy and I started the engine. After a few seconds it seized and I realized that the bow line had slipped overboard and gotten tangled in the prop. The price of my inattention was a dip in Lake Michigan in order to free the line from my prop.

There were several layers of stupid here. First, the line should have been tied down. It was coiled on the deck but that was inadequate. Second, I should have paid attention before starting the engine. I hadn’t gone forward earlier so I didn’t include that on my mental checklist. Totally my fault. Third, the line was too long. A shorter line might have gone overboard but not been able to reach the prop. The worst part was that I bought a new, shorter line but hadn’t swapped them yet.

In the end all is well. It smarts a bit to admit my mistake, but it was one more lesson learned during another day of sailing. We learn by doing and that means (hopefully) that every time we do we will learn. I can’t think of a better reason for trying again.